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Sticky cover plates

Back to the Maintenance, Repair and Customization Room

Peter H
Feb 22, 2009 1:03 AM GMT

When I play, I can really move if he cver plate is wet from siliva. But, as I play, it dries out and I loose my ability to move quickly from one hole to the next. I've tried simply licking the damn thigs but I don't always have time. I'm considering taking my cover plates to a buffing wheel.

What do you do to keep the coverplate slick?


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Comments (13)

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Feb 22, 2009 2:16 AM GMT
Oldwailer Replied:

This sounds almost sarcastic, I know--but I just drink lots of water (beer dries me out a bit) and find a nanosecond here and there to lick my lips. Just let your tounge slap out there and wet your lips now and then. Let the lips to the transferring of lube to the mouthpiece.

I've never tried buffing--let us know if that works. . .


Feb 22, 2009 3:06 AM GMT
Zooza Z Replied:

Drink plenty of water usually happens form dehydration the lips catch abit but buffing might help a small amount especially from initial playing What harps are you currently playing?


Feb 22, 2009 4:03 AM GMT
jawbone s Replied:

ASTRO GLIDE - Just ask Sarge - he knows all about it (If I could find the emoticons I would put a bunch of smiley ones here)

I wouldn't buff the covers, I don't think you could get them much smoother than the chrome. Maybe try a little lip balm just to keep the moisture from absorbing into your lips so fast.


Feb 22, 2009 6:55 AM GMT
Zooza Z Replied:

Yeah lip balm a few hours before playing helps try that... keep hydrated too and keep lips moist


Feb 22, 2009 8:09 AM GMT
Sjoeberg D Replied:

Hi Peter,

Try to be aware of your lip embochure. Your lips is almost always dry on the front part. Try to be aware of the "border" on your lips,.. were they suddenly becomes wet. Your embochure needs always to be in contact with the "wet area" to secure the supply of saliva on the cover plate area. Before I start playing, I always put the harmonica deep into my mouth and move the harmonica sideways a few times to apply some saliva on the cover plates, from there you can keep the saliva supply by having contact with your "wet area" of your lips.

Best regards

Sjoeberg Dick


Feb 22, 2009 4:07 PM GMT
Brutus Maximus Replied:

I almost bought a thing of Astroglide at Walgreen's last night, but they had most of their "personal lubricants" locked up and I didn't have time to look for a clerk to help me. I once tried plain ol' KY jelly--it was super slick at first, but it dried up and got gummy after I'd been playing awhile. Not a good thing. Does Astroglide hold up better? They also had Astroglide X, which was more expensive. I wonder if it's worth the extra $.

Do you suppose the makers of Astroglide are aware that their product has become "The Harp Player's Friend?" Maybe they'd offer endorsement deals. LOL

Another funny thought: When I was looking at the various lubes at Walgreens last night, I considered asking the young woman at the Cosmetics counter which one she would recommend. "Pardon me, miss--would you recommend the Astroglide or the Astroglide X?" Even with all the makeup caked on her face, I'm sure she'd turn 20 shades of red in her embarrassment.


Feb 23, 2009 6:26 AM GMT
Oldwailer Replied:

I don't know--some of the places I go, if I started douching harps up with KY jelly people would fall into two camps: those that cleared out fast, and those that got in line at the edge of the stage!


Feb 23, 2009 1:54 PM GMT
AirMojo (Ken H) Replied:

Astroglide ? Is that the stuff Clark Griswold put on the bottom of his snow saucer sled ?


Feb 23, 2009 3:50 PM GMT
jawbone s Replied:

Pretty much the same!!!! I'm afraid to use it, can't hang on to the harps!!!


Mar 03, 2009 1:19 PM GMT
Elk River Replied:

Avoid astroglide. Avoid putting anything on the harp like that, it will run down in the reeds. What I'd say is:keep your lips healthy, don't let them dry out in the first place. What I do when I'm playing fast is run it from one to 10 in my mouth to dampen it, then I maintain that dampness as I play. Without dampening it at the start, you can't keep it damp.

The lip health thing is pretty important.

Also, I would not want to risk my wife finding a bottle of astroglide in my case.


Mar 03, 2009 3:48 PM GMT
Kingobad Replied:

Astroglide is a "must" for the "fartomonica." Just remember not to attempt an overblow on stage.


Mar 03, 2009 5:08 PM GMT
Brutus Maximus Replied:

I actually bought a bottle of the Astroglide X and tried it at a gig the other night. It works well. You apply just a tiny amount to your lips--a couple of drops forms a very thin, slippery film that lasts for an entire set. At that rate, I'd say the bottle I bought will last several lifetimes unless I have occasion to use it for its intended purpose (which doesn't seem very likely at this point in my life!). I don't think there should be any issue with the stuff getting down to the reeds, but I'll test that theory over the next few weeks and report back.

The biggest thing about it was that I told our sax player what I was using, who told everyone else in the band, who eventually announced it to the audience. Normally I wouldn't mind, but since the club was full of drunken rednecks I wished I hadn't said anything. I sure don't need to have my ass kicked by a bunch of toothless hillbillies, especially over something like that. My advice, should you ever decide to try Astroglide as a lip lubricant, is to keep it to yourself....


Mar 04, 2009 4:56 AM GMT
Oldwailer Replied:

ROFL!!



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